Where do your sales come from/ How do you promote your work (friends, referrals, contracts, word of mouth)? 

      Friends, referrals, word of mouth, people who see my work in shows or take my art classes.
How has your work changed to suit its market?

      Not much. It has changed to suit myself, but now that I’m teaching, my sales are not as important to me.  Although I certainly enjoy them!

Deborah Conn

Talk about your experiences with online retail vs. brick-and-mortar stores.

      Although I spend considerable time on my website and social media and a newsletter, I have made the majority of my sales at events where the public is directly in front of my work or at shops and galleries. I've had great one day art show sales, but also some art shows where I didn't even make my entry fee back.
How has your work changed to suit its market?
      I do more commissions than I would like because I am often asked and they are sure guaranteed money.
What advice would you give someone starting out now?
      Understand that marketing takes a lot of time, but is necessary. Your art can be amazing, but you have to get it in front of people to succeed. You will need to learn at least a little about record-keeping, taxes, business licensing, inventory, etc too. The fun part is making of the art, but there is a lot more required to be an artist.

What is the Name of Your Company?

      nmdART
What is Your Medium?

      watercolor, mixed media, monotypes, alcohol ink items
Where do You Sell Your Art?

      I sell online, social media, a couple of galleries and shops.

Did you go to school for what you do now?
      I majored in fine art, concentrating in painting. Although I honed my skills in drawing, not much technique was taught in painting in college. I learned to “talk” art more than make art. We never learned anything helpful in art being a business, such as inventory systems, keeping records, approaching prospective galleries, or writing grants.
Do you work on your art part or full-time?
       It is my only earned income, but I currently spend only the hourly equivalent of “part-time” pursuing it.

Nancy Murphree Davis

Talk about your experiences with online retail vs. brick-and-mortar stores.

          Online is easier in a lot of ways - no personal contact needed! and once you do the hard work of getting it set up, it runs itself. It’s also less effective: people usually buy art because they feel a personal connection to you, the artist, and it’s very difficult to have that connection “click” solely through the internet.

What advice would you give someone starting out now?

           One of my teachers told me this, and I think it’s basically the truest thing I know about art (well, this and “Make forty more, and then maybe you’ll have something.”) : If there’s anything - anything else at all! - that you love, that you can do - do that. Art is only worth it, it’s only viable, if that’s the only thing for you.

More Coming Soon!

What is Your Medium?  

          Printmaker
Where do You Sell Your Art?

          I sell privately, online; I sell through the lovely emporium, Stifel&Capra!; and I also sell through the Lee Arts Center in Arlington, VA

What inspired you to start your art as a business?

          There’s pretty literally nothing else that I could see myself doing. I have an art degree, which is not exactly the most sought-after diploma! And also I get very very cranky if I spend more than a couple of weeks away from the studio. I had to do something to earn money, and this is pretty much what I excel at.
What was your biggest challenge during your start-up?

           Taking myself seriously. I still default to thinking of my art as a hobby - it seems less scary that way. But that is bad! Less scary is also very boring.

Westin Muntain

Looking Back on Starting Up

What is Your Medium?

      watercolor and collage, some printmaking, some drawing
Where do You Sell Your Art?

     I sell through a local shop private commissions, art shows and markets

When did you first consider yourself an artist?

      Actually, I was painting for years (I started in 1998) before I would use the word artist to describe myself. Only when I began to really add my own elements and approaches to painting did I start feeling like an artist.
Did you go to school for what you do now? 

       Not formally, as in an MFA or college art classes. I studied primarily through classes at the Art League in the Torpedo Factory and in many workshops with nationally known instructors. 

Talk about your experiences with online retail vs. brick-and-mortar stores. 

        I have had much more success with brick and mortar, although I do have a website to promote my work. 

Foliage

​​Designworks